Reviews

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All That Is Necessary:

Kimba, The Caffeinated Book Reviewer – 3/5 cups of coffee

“Coughlin brings up some tough social subjects: prejudices, corruption, politics, and through characters makes you see the situation from all perspectives. The author has strong command of her story and the tale flowed smoothly, allowing me to immerse myself.”

Mark Baker, Epinions.com, 5/5 stars

“I couldn’t believe how quickly I was drawn into the story, and I blame it fully on the characters.  They were sharp from page one and never lost that pull.”

Maggie Duncan, Unexpected Paths

“This is a complex, multi-layered plot, with subtleties that pop up days or weeks after finishing the book.”

Thrown Out: Stories from Exeter

eFiction Magazine, December 2011 issue

“Coughlin’s writing style is crisp, succinct, and that makes these characters as close as if you’re sitting next to them in the bleachers at a softball game.”

Kimba, The Caffeinated Book Reviewer - 4/5 cups of coffee

“Coughlin delivered stories that quickly immersed me into the tale.  The characters had depth and some of them crossed over into different stories.  The storylines were compelling and spanned over 40 years.  They touched on tough subjects such as homophobia, town secrets, spousal abuse and fear of commitment.”

Mark, Epinions.com - 4/5 stars

“…the characters were brought to life from the very beginning, so the story was extremely powerful.  I could feel Chris’ pain on every page as he struggled with what he was going to do.”

The Kindle Book Review — 5 stars

“Jennie made me feel a part of the town of Exeter and I wanted to read more and more about the realistic characters.”

Alison DeLuca, Fresh Pot of Tea

“Obviously,  the author knows her stuff. More importantly, she knows how to communicate it.”

Interviews:

The Bookcast: (Audio, requires Flash) “Small towns in America aren’t always like Mayberry or River City or Lake Wobegon. Sometimes they’re like Exeter, Massachusetts, the setting of Jennie Coughlin‘s book ‘Thrown Out: Stories from Exeter.’ This is a town of grudges, and secrets, and regrets. Alliances form and reform, the past becomes the future, where young boys find bodies in the marsh — and where nothing is ever quite what it looks like on the surface.”

A second Bookcast interview, this one for All That Is Necessary.

Unexpected Paths (Phyllis A. Duncan): “But really, a theme that came out as I was writing “Thrown Out” was that we accept things in people we know that we might not in people we don’t know.”

Back on Unexpected Paths for All That is Necessary: “For all the characters, I hope readers take them on their own terms — who they are, what they do, why they do it, how they interact with others.”

T.G. Long: “I never really considered not writing in small-town New England. It’s where I grew up, it’s what I covered as a reporter. It’s a phenomenal canvas for storytelling. Small towns allow for such richness because everybody’s connected in a million ways so it’s the perfect setting for a series.”

Reader Reviews

From Amazon:

Five Stars — A glimpse of small town America

“… Almost instantly I found myself caring about these people and wanting to know what happened to them between the events in these stories. Any book that makes me late back from lunch has to be good!” — Anne M.

Five Stars — Escape to a small New England town!

“… Jennie’s writing flows so well that reading her work is a pleasure. Exeter is a place I look forward to visiting again soon!” — S. Greenberg

Five Stars — Escape to Exeter Without Leaving Your Own Home

“The characters are strong and rich, and the story flows so brilliantly that I just want to pack up my life here in Australia and move myself to Exeter.” — Rebecca E.

Five Stars — Small Town Characters and an Engaging Story

“Jennie has a way of crafting engaging characters who pull you in, and from the intrigue of Bones of the Past, it is clear that Exeter has its own stories to tell.” — Breezy

From Goodreads:

Five Stars

“… Jennie Coughlin has a wonderful way with words and triumphs at bringing the characters to life so vividly it feels as though they’re people I know rather than fictional characters people I’ve never met….” — Jo

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